General

The mirror was small and cheap, about the size of the cell phones all the up-town kids were carrying. It was the kind you see in a dollar store thickly rimmed in white plastic, the kind that's in landfill not even a month later. The shiny surface was covered in greasy fingerprints and there was a lipstick smear. Jared stuck it in his pocket anyway, tacky though it was it could be useful in a pinch - a flash of light at the right time from the right place could make all the difference.

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, February 25, 2015.
General

The old painting leans against the wall, dusty and unloved. Petra runs a finger along the gold framing, her pink nail polish almost purple in the half-light, and it comes away dirty. In the grime that must have taken years to form there is now a streak of gold. She holds it up. With the light that struggles to make it through the grime on the window the colours are subdued, but she can already tell it's a country scene. The hills roll green, interwoven with the golds of autumn. How it could have lain here in the dark for so long without her knowing? She moves slowly down the attic stairs, one hand on the rungs, one on the painting. It's time for it to have pride of place...

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, February 11, 2015.
General

“Ya know,” said Travis, “I wonder if they eat like that at home.” The broom clanked to the pan as he swept the dusty popped kernels and candy wrappers inside. With the light up brighter than the movie goers get to see, every speck was illuminated like it was its red carpet night – the Oscars for garbage. Pete sniggered.

“Yeah, bet they do. I'd hate to be around when they eat spaghetti.” He laughed so much that he almost missed the small package left behind. Travis's reply was lost like the teacher on Snoopy, “Wharrr whaar wharr.” In seconds his co-worker would see it. Pete faked a cough, swiftly doubling up to stow it under his thin polyester uniform before excusing himself to the “gents.”