General

Carnes sat on the edge of a bench and watched with admiration the long nervous hands and the slim tapering fingers of the famous scientist. Dr. Bird stood well over six feet and weighed two hundred and six pounds stripped: his massive shoulders and heavy shock of unruly black hair combined to give him the appearance of a prize-fighter--until one looked at his hands. Acid stains and scars could not hide the beauty of those mobile hands, the hands of an artist and a dreamer. An artist Dr. Bird was, albeit his artistry expressed itself in the most delicate and complicated experiments in the realms of pure and applied science that the world has ever seen, rather than in the commoner forms of art.

By dan, January 31, 2013.

Found in The Cave of Horror, authored by Captain S. P. Meek.

General

The object made no sense at all. It had no internal mechanism more complicated than a pocket watch, yet it was cold like dry ice. It was the size of a golf ball, round, but without the pitted surface and stuck to any bare skin in touched. Poor Nathan lost a chunk of his hand that way. If we dropped it into hot water it would turn it to ice faster than our cameras could capture the change. It was as if that tiny sphere could never take in enough heat and whatever it took it could never give back. It was simply frozen. We tried larger and larger volumes but to no avail. It made no sense at all that something so small had no limits. We would have tested it more but that's the last we ever saw of it. Whoever has it now will be exploring its uses no doubt. But to use an object is not the same as to understand it, and only from understanding can we further our scientific knowledge. And whilst I want the Nobel Prize, of course I do, it's the thirst of the quest that keeps me rising each day.

General

When Ted measured the water for his coffee machine he used a finely graduated glass beaker and always held the meniscus to eye level. He wasn't sure why his artsy friends laughed about it, it's what everyone did in the lounge at work. With his lovers he formulated hypotheses about their motives and set about designing a fair test to see if he was right. He was never sure why they thought his tests were inappropriate and Ted sometimes tried to explain how he'd gone to great lengths to control the variables. He put his friends in categories for different purposes and kept it on his desktop, so once he identified his mood using objective criteria the data would tell him who he should arrange to hang out with. He disliked recipes that said "3 bananas" or "one pepper," if there wasn't a measurement in grams he was irritated. How could he replicate the writer's results unless he knew exactly what they had done? His scientific papers were flawless and he lived for his work.

By joanwu, October 21, 2014.
General

Tiger wasn't interested in the money. She wanted to live of course and buy food, but since the age of eleven, when she learned about global warming in class, she had just wanted to save the planet. Now she was twenty-five and still on the same mission. She had accepted that her part in the solution was likely small, she was after all just one person in billions. But she knew that if she worked steadily that this one small woman could achieve something significant. She had never yet taken a job based on the pay, she always looked at what the position could teach her, where was this research team heading and who benefitted. Her mother chastised her for being an idealist, she knew her daughter could make more money. But her father just waved away those concerns, he knew his child better; money was cold and meaningless to her, yet a simple flower filled her with awe.

By joanwu, October 21, 2014.