General

Five minutes later, Alex stood on the deck dressed only in shorts and a T-shirt, with an oxygen cylinder strapped to his back and two respirators - one to breathe through, the other spare - dangling at his side. He would liked to have put on a wet suit, but he hadn't been able to find one his size. He would just have to hope the water wasn't too cold. The BCD he was wearing was old and it was too big for him, but he had tested it quickly and at least it worked. He looked at his instrument console: pressure gauge, depth gauge, and compass. He had 3,000 psi in his air tank. More than he would need...He was breaking the single most critical rule in the world of scuba diving: Never dive alone...He was holding an out-of-date dive computer...

By james, May 29, 2012.

Found in Alex Rider, Skeleton Key, authored by Anthony Horowitz.

General

The two agents made their ball-important buddy checks, each one looking over the other's equipment. No pipes twisted. Air in the tanks. Weights and releases. Finally, they went over to the side of the boat and sat with their backs facing the sea. Carver gave Troy the all-clear sign: second finger and thumb form an O with the other fingers raised. They lowered their masks and rolled over backward, disappearing immediately into the depths of the sea.

By james, May 29, 2012.

Found in Alex Rider, Skeleton Key, authored by Anthony Horowitz.