General

Can we see the cultural exchange as a form of societal cross-pollination? This idea is much akin to lining up two pages with holes in different places, when put together there are either none or few, essentially, we can learn how to heal each other.

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, March 26, 2020.

Found in Nexus; A Treatise in Defence of Love as Mankind's Answer, authored by Angela Abraham.

General

Every culture is a cult, the word "cult' itself is neutral. Culture can have money as its nexus and turn into a dog-eat-dog fight to the bottom; or otherwise culture can have love as its nexus and have cooperation lead us into greater function. The choice, as ever, in money vs. love, is ours.

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, March 26, 2020.

Found in Nexus; A Treatise in Defence of Love as Mankind's Answer, authored by Angela Abraham.

General

Language and culture are reflections of one another, that feed each other, for better and worse, and so we must take great care with the power of our words.

General

How else can we become word-detectives? We tend to think that what we grew up with is right, it’s as if we are fish being asked to see the water for the first time. We can help ourselves to gain perspective of our culture by seeing ourselves from the perspectives of other cultures...

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, March 26, 2020.

Found in Nexus: A Treatise in Defence of Love as Mankind's Answer, authored by Angela Abraham.

General

We can also learn much from the words that have come into fashion and fallen out of fashion. What do these words say about the way our society is evolving (or devolving as is sometimes the case)?

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, March 26, 2020.

Found in Nexus; A Treatise in Defence of Love as Mankind's Answer, authored by Angela Abraham.

General

As Kahlil Gibran said, in his work "The Prophet,"

“Work is love made visible.”

Thus, when we see what each other has made or done, we can see what the other loves. And this is true of what we say, how we say it and the care with which we choose our words, the anthems of our cultures. There are languages in which “child” translates as “sacred gift,” a constant link for the brain between our children and how we should see and treat them.

By Angela Abraham, @daisydescriptionari, March 26, 2020.

Found in Nexus; A Treatise in Defence of Love as Mankind's Answer, authored by Angela Abraham.