General

Shakespeare was a genius wordsmith, yet primitive in his emotional development, as many men of his age were. Shakespeare "shakes a spear" when he should engage empathy and seek a real comprehension of those beyond the boundaries of his normal life. Otherwise this emotional coldness toward the "other" brings out his primitive drive to obvious effect.

General

Shakespeare was a genius and yet more of a witch than any his literature framed for such linguistic crimes. After all it was he that spoke the words that tied together "foul" with "fair," rather than "kindness" with "fair." For Shakespeare's words were weaved often for political gains, to sway society the way the rich and powerful wanted to, to make facts of fictions, to use fear in his surgical manner. He knew the pen mightier than the sword because he knew the truth of the power of words. Yet he was neither a satanic nor angel witch, yet a freelancer for his own ego. As we see in MacBeth, he was a man that showed no comprehension of true love, nor what it demands of men and women. He was a man of his age that feared women and saw intelligence, strength and logical thought as masculine rather than human qualities. He failed to see the evil of the kings and barons as evil rather than male qualities. The men in crowns were the crones of the age far more than hunched old women who may pass the messages of heaven and hell. He was a true social tweaker, yet not the social evolutionist that Charles Dickens sought to become, nor that which this angel witch is. Genius writers are always this way, and this is why heaven and hell battle for our souls more than others... and why we must always choose to serve heaven and love. We must not shake spears, not present any bill, nor make it an act of our own will or ego - yet put forth our woes and words as if spoken by angels, as if they were the callings of God from heaven to earth.

General

Lady MacBeth is the warped tour of feminism. She takes the notion of nurture, of nursing a baby, and turns it into the notion of poison, to poison society. This is evil, bold and plain. She is spoken of as masculine, that she should only bring men-children, yet this suggests that men are evil instead of naturally nurturing and kind as God intended. Shakespeare over and over shows his misunderstandings of women (that women can be strong, independent and good), of men (that men can be strong, independent and good) and the nature of good vs evil (that this battle should never be conflated with either gender or dominance issues).